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Educational Resources

Retirement

Where will your retirement money come from? If you’re like most people, qualified-retirement plans, Social Security, and personal savings and investments are expected to play a role. Once you have estimated the amount of money you may need for retirement, a sound approach involves taking a close look at your potential retirement-income sources.

Three Key Questions to Answer Before Taking Social Security

When to start? Should I continue to work? How can I maximize my benefit?
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5 Benefits of Working in Retirement

Here are 5 reason why you may consider working through retirement.
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Catch-Up Contributions

Workers 50+ may make contributions to their qualified retirement plans above the limits imposed on younger workers.
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Estate

Effective estate management enables you to manage your affairs during your lifetime and control the distribution of your wealth after death. An effective estate strategy can spell out your healthcare wishes and ensure that they're carried out – even if you are unable to communicate. It can even designate someone to manage your financial affairs should you be unable to do so.

A Living Trust Primer

Living trusts are popular, but their appropriateness will depend upon your individual needs and objectives.
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A Living Trust Primer

Living trusts are popular, but their appropriateness will depend upon your individual needs and objectives.
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Understanding the Alternate Valuation Date

Executors can value the estate on the date of death, or on its six-month anniversary —the “Alternate Valuation Date."
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Investment

Investing should be easy – just buy low and sell high – but most of us have trouble following that simple advice. There are principles and strategies that may enable you to put together an investment portfolio that reflects your risk tolerance, time horizon, and goals. Understanding these principles and strategies can help you avoid some of the pitfalls that snarl some investors.

Investing with Your Heart

For some, the social impact of investing is just as important as the return, perhaps more important.
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A Look at Diversification

Diversification is an investment principle designed to manage risk, but it can't prevent against a loss.
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The Investment Risk No One’s Ever Heard Of

You face a risk for which the market does not compensate you, that can not be easily reduced through diversification.
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Insurance

Insurance transfers the financial risk of life's events to an insurance company. A sound insurance strategy can help protect your family from the financial consequences of those events. A strategy can include personal insurance, liability insurance, and life insurance.

Insurance Needs Assessment: When You're Newly Married

Marriage changes everything, including your insurance needs.
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Social Media: #NewestBusinessLiabilityRisk

Social media may be a modern imperative for businesses looking to grow and build their brand, but it also introduces risk.
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Understanding the Basics of Medigap Policies

Important as it is, Medicare does not cover the full range of health-care expenses you may experience in your golden years.
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Tax

Understanding tax strategies and managing your tax bill should be part of any sound financial approach. Some taxes can be deferred, and others can be managed through tax-efficient investing. With careful and consistent preparation, you may be able to manage the impact of taxes on your financial efforts.

The Facts About Income Tax

Millions faithfully file their 1040 forms each April. But some things about federal income taxes may surprise you.
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Tax Deductions You Won't Believe

Here are some examples of deductions from the IRS that were permitted and some that were, uh, too creative.
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Donating Art: Taxation Abstraction

The tax rules that govern donating art are complex and confusing. Take a closer look.
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Money

One of the keys to a sound financial strategy is spending less than you take in, and then finding a way to put your excess to work. A money management approach involves creating budgets to understand and make decisions about where your money is going. It also involves knowing where you may be able to put your excess cash to work.

U.S. Personal Savings Rate

What can be learned from the savings rate?
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What Is My Current Cash Flow?

Assess whether you are running “in the black” or “in the red” each month.
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U.S. Personal Savings Rate

What can be learned from the savings rate?
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Calculators

Roth 401(k) vs. Traditional 401(k)

This calculator compares employee contributions to a Roth 401(k) and a traditional 401(k).
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Saving for College

This calculator can help you estimate how much you should be saving for college.
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Saving for Retirement

This calculator can help you estimate how much you may need to save for retirement.
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